Relation between selenomethionine content in dietary selenium sources and selenium deposition in broiler muscle tissue

Selenium is an essential trace element for animal nutrition. Dietary selenium sources can be divided into organic and inorganic selenium. Organic selenium allows to build Se reserves in tissues, mainly in muscles, in the form of selenomethionine which can be used in stress conditions to improve antioxidant defenses (Surai, 2016). The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the selenomethionine (SeMet) content in dietary selenium sources (two different selenized yeast products (SeYeast) and L-selenomethionine (L-SeMet)) and the selenium deposition in broiler muscle tissue.

Orffa, 2016

Materials and Methods

  • Male broilers
  • 4 dietary treatments (starter diet, 0-14d)
    • 0,2 ppm Se from Sodium selenite (NaSe)
    • 0,2 ppm Se from SeYeast low (26% Se in form of SeMet)
    • 0,2 ppm Se from SeYeast high (69% Se in form of SeMet)
    • 0,2 ppm Se from L-SeMet (Excential Selenium4000)
  • 20 animals per treatment
  • 4 replicates of 5 animals per pen
  • Breast samples of 3 broilers per pen were taken on d14 and
    analyzed for Se content by ICP-MS (Ghent University)

Results

 

Conclusion

This study shows that selenium deposition in broiler muscle tissue is related to the added selenomethionine in the diet (P < 0.0001). SeYeast with high SeMet content results in higher Se deposition compared to SeYeast with low SeMet content (P < 0.0001). L-Selenomethionine supplementation results in the highest Se deposition. 

 

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